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The History of Sound Healing





Sound healing is the use of sound waves to promote physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. It is based on the principle that the entire universe and all matter is made of energy and is in a state of vibration. When we listen to sound, these vibrations can affect our own bodies and minds, stimulating healing and transformation.

The history of sound healing is long and varied. It has been practiced in cultures around the world for centuries, and there are many different techniques that have been used. Some of the most common methods include:

  • Tibetan singing bowls: These bowls are made of a special metal alloy and are played by rubbing the rim with a mallet. The resulting sound is said to have a calming and meditative effect.

  • Chanting: This involves repeating a mantra or sacred phrase aloud. The repetitive sound is said to help to quiet the mind and promote relaxation.

  • Tone therapy: This involves using specific frequencies of sound to target different areas of the body. For example, a low frequency sound may be used to stimulate the production of endorphins, while a high frequency sound may be used to promote relaxation.

Sound healing is a relatively new field of study, and there is still much that we do not know about how it works. However, there is a growing body of evidence that suggests that it can be effective in treating a variety of conditions, including stress, anxiety, pain, and sleep disorders.



One of the earliest known references to sound healing can be found in the Vedas, the sacred texts of Hinduism. The Vedas describe how sound can be used to create harmony in the body and mind. In ancient Greece, Pythagoras and his followers believed that music could be used to heal the soul. They believed that each note of the musical scale corresponded to a different part of the body, and that listening to music could help to balance the body's energies.

In the Middle Ages, sound healing was practiced by the Native Americans, the Chinese, and the Egyptians. The Native Americans used drums and rattles to induce trance states, while the Chinese used gongs and bells to promote healing. The Egyptians believed that sound could be used to communicate with the gods, and they built temples with acoustic features that were designed to amplify sound.


In the modern era, sound healing has been revived by a number of different practitioners. In the 1950s, Dr. Alfred Tomatis developed a method of sound therapy called Tomatis therapy. Tomatis therapy uses specially designed headphones to deliver specific frequencies of sound to the ears. This is said to help to improve hearing, speech, and cognitive function.

In the 1970s, Dr. John Beaulieu developed a method of sound therapy called Solfeggio frequencies. Solfeggio frequencies are a series of tones that are said to have specific healing properties. These tones have been used to treat a variety of conditions, including stress, anxiety, and pain. Bring us up to today, modern sound healing is a practice that uses sound to promote physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. It is based on the idea that sound can have a positive effect on the body's energy field, which can lead to improved health and well-being. There are many different techniques that are used in sound healing, such as singing, chanting, drumming, and using instruments such as tuning forks and gongs. There is no one "right" way to do sound healing, and the best approach will vary depending on the individual and their needs. However, all forms of sound healing share the common goal of using sound to promote healing and well-being.

You can see that sound healing has been practiced for centuries in many different cultures around the world. It is a holistic approach to healing that can be used to address a wide range of issues, including stress, anxiety, pain, and depression. On top of all this sound healing can also be used to promote relaxation, improve sleep, and boost the immune system. Sound healing is truly a wonderful thing.




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